Crohn's Disease | CHOP Research Institute
 

Crohn's Disease

Published on
Apr 18, 2022
In the Emerging Innovators in Collaborative Research Program, up-and-coming researchers highlight their work.

Dr. Mattei is an attending physician in the Division of General, Thoracic and Fetal Surgery and specializes in pediatric surgical oncology, inflammatory bowel disease, and minimally invasive and robotic surgery. His research interests are in oncology and IBD.

E-mail:
mattei [at] chop.edu

The purpose of this study is to compare the genes of African American children and adults who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with the genes of those who do not have IBD.

Dr. Huang works on methodology development to understand the dynamics of disease activities and inform health management using multivariate longitudinal health data. She also works on data integration in Clinical Research Networks.

E-mail:
huangj5 [at] chop.edu

Dr. Monos is an internationally recognized expert on histocompatibility (HLA) molecules. His work covers a wide spectrum of HLA-related issues that pertain to both the molecular (structure/function) aspects of HLAs, as well as the genetics of the major histocompatibility complex, that includes the genes encoding the HLA molecules.

E-mail:
monosd [at] chop.edu

Dr. Cardinale's research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of gene expression and gene regulation in autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, and systemic sclerosis. He uses data from large-scale genomic studies to identify disease-causing genetic variants and functionally explore the target genes of those variants.

E-mail:
cardinalec [at] chop.edu
Published on
Jan 11, 2019
“Please play your video game,” said parents — never. Find out why this phrase may become common among caregivers of children with autism and ADHD.
Published on
May 18, 2018
This week in the news, research from the Cardiac Center and the Division of Urology make headlines for children's health.
Published on
Jul 5, 2016
Microbes are on us and in us, and researchers are increasingly becoming aware that they are a vital part of us. Across The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania a variety of research efforts are underway to understand these populations of bacteria, viruses, and other tiny life forms, known as the microbiome, and their impact on health.
Published on
Jun 18, 2015
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endicronology & Metabolism shows a drug approved to treat Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis leads to “rapid improvements” in bone density and structure.