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E-mail
youngjf [at] email.chop.edu
Location - People View
Room 8473

2716 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19146
United States

Research Topics
Jami F. Young, PhD
Jami F. Young
Director of Psychosocial Research

Dr. Young is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the identification, prevention, and treatment of adolescent depression. Her scholarship is driven by the need to understand what factors predispose youth to depression and the desire to develop, study, and disseminate interventions to help address the unmet needs of youth with mental health problems.

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Bio

Dr. Young is a clinical psychologist with expertise in psychosocial interventions for preventing and treating adolescent depression. She serves as the director of Psychosocial Research and director/PI of the Adolescent Depression Prevention and Treatment (ADePT) Lab at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

She has received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for her research on Interpersonal Psychotherapy–Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a group preventive intervention for adolescent depression which targets interpersonal vulnerabilities for depression. She has conducted three randomized controlled trials of IPT-AST delivered in schools and has examined the effects of this program on a variety of mental health, interpersonal, and school-related outcomes.

Currently, Dr. Young has a collaborative R01 to conduct a personalized prevention study to examine whether the effects of depression prevention programs can be maximized by matching youth to programs based on their vulnerabilities for depression.

Dr. Young's research has also included the study of risk factors for later psychopathology. She was the principal investigator of a collaborative R01 longitudinal study of genetic, cognitive, and interpersonal risk factors for youth depression. Most recently, she has begun to examine the identification and management of adolescent depression in primary care settings.

In addition to her research, Dr. Young has been involved in national and international efforts to train community clinicians in evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions for adolescent depression. Taken together, Dr. Young's work aims to decrease the incidence of adolescent depression and increase children's access to evidence-based assessment, prevention, and treatment of depression and other behavioral health conditions.

Education and Training

BA, Cornell University (Psychology), 1996

MA, Fordham University (Clinical Psychology), 1997

PhD, Fordham University (Clinical Psychology), 2001

Fellowship, Columbia University (Child Psychiatry), 2004

Titles and Academic Titles

Director of Psychosocial Research

Clinical Psychologist

Associate Professor of Psychiatry

Professional Awards

Gerald Klerman Young Investigator Award, International Society for Interpersonal Psychotherapy, 2009

Board of Trustees Research Fellowship for Scholarly Excellence, Rutgers University, 2013

Chancellor's Scholar, Rutgers University, 2015

Publication Highlights

Young JF, Jones JD, Sbrilli M, Benas JS, Spiro C, Haimm C, Gallop R, Mufson L, Gillham JE. Long-term effects from a school-based trial comparing Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training to group counseling. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2018 Jul; 1-9. PMID: 29979882
Hankin BL, Young JF, Gallop R, Garber J. Cognitive and interpersonal vulnerabilities to adolescent depression: Classification of risk profiles for a personalized prevention approach. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2018 Jul; 1-9. PMID: 29979882
Young JF, Benas JS, Schueler CM, Gallop R, Gillham JE, Mufson L. A randomized depression prevention trial comparing Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training to group counseling in schools. Prev Sci. 2016 Apr; 17(3):314-24. PMID: 26638219
Hankin BL, Young JF, Abela JR, Smolen A, Jenness JL, Gulley LD, Technow JR, Gottlieb AB, Cohen JR, Oppenheimer, CW. Depression from childhood into late adolescence: Influence of gender, development, genetic susceptibility, and peer stress. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2015 Nov; 124(4):803-16. PMID: 26595469

Links of Interest