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E-mail
nissim [at] email.chop.edu
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3615 Civic Center Blvd
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Research Topics
Itzhak Nissim, PhD
Director, Metabolomics Core

Dr. Nissim is a biochemist and a pioneer in the application of stable isotopes, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance to study metabolome and fluxome and their coupling to genome in normal and disease states. His long-standing interest focuses on understanding the cause, mechanisms, and outcome of metabolic disorders.

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Bio

Dr. Nissim is a biochemist and a pioneer in the application of stable isotopes, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance to study metabolome and fluxome and their coupling to genome in normal and disease states. His long-standing interest focuses on understanding the cause, mechanisms, and outcome of metabolic disorders.

Throughout his career, exemplar projects by Dr. Nissim include: the mechanisms of hepatic metabolic dysfunction and understanding the molecular and metabolome/fluxome malfunction in metabolic syndrome; pathogenic mitochondrial integrity and function; and the molecular and metabolomic characteristics of carcinoma.

As a director of the Metabolomic Core at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, he has collaborated, supported, and contributed to many projects dealing with metabolomics and fluxomics functions in normal and disease states. His research approach incorporates the metabolome and fluxome to the genome by employing techniques such as stable isotopes, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular biology, which has fundamentally transformed the study of major disease processes like cancer, fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and the coupling between neurological function and metabolism.

Education and Training

BSc, Bar Ilan University (Biochemistry), 1972

MSc, Hebrew University (Life Science), 1974

PhD, Weizmann Institute (Biochemistry and Biophysics), 1979

Titles and Academic Titles

Director, Metabolomic Core

Investigator

Professor of Pediatrics

Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics

Professional Memberships

American Society of Nephrology, 1985-

International Society of Nephrology, 1988-

American Chemical Society, 1990-

New York Academy of Sciences, 1995

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1997-

American Physiologic Society, 1998-

Professional Awards

International Union Against Cancer on International Cancer Research Technology Transfer Award, 1979

Research Achievement Award, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1991

Established Investigator Award, American Heart Association, 1991

Research Recognition Award, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Pennsylvania Chapter, 2002

 

Publication Highlights

Ochocki JD, Khare S, Hess M, Ackerman D, Qiu B, Daisak JI, Worth AJ, Lin N, Lee P, Xie H, Li B, Wubbenhorst B, Maguire TG, Nathanson KL, Alwine JC, Blair IA, Nissim I, Keith B, Simon MC. Arginase 2 Suppresses Renal Carcinoma Progression via Biosynthetic Cofactor Pyridoxal Phosphate Depletion and Increased Polyamine Toxicity. Cell Metab. 2018 Jun; 27(6):1263-1280.e6. PMID: 29754953
Li B, Qiu B, Lee DS, Walton ZE, Ochocki JD, Mathew LK, Mancuso A, Gade TP, Keith B, Nissim I, Simon MC. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase opposes renal carcinoma progression. Nature. 2014 Sep; 513(7517):251-5. PMID: 25043030
Nissim I, Horyn O, Daikhin Y, Chen P, Li C, Wehrli SL, Nissim I, Yudkoff M. The molecular and metabolic influence of long term agmatine consumption. J Biol Chem. 2014 Apr; 289(14):9710-29. PMID: 24523404
Cang C, Zhou Y, Navarro B, Seo YJ, Aranda K, Shi L, Battaglia-Hsu S, Nissim I, Clapham DE, Ren D. mTOR regulates lysosomal ATP-sensitive two-pore Na(+) channels to adapt to metabolic state. Cell. 2013 Feb; 152(4):778-790. PMCID: PMC3908667
Weinberg JM, Venkatachalam MA, Roeser NF, Nissim I. Mitochondrial dysfunction during hypoxia/reoxygenation and its correction by anaerobic metabolism of citric acid cycle intermediates. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2000 Mar; 97(6):2826-31. PMID: 10717001