Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | CHOP Research Institute
 

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of an experimental form of therapy, known as BEAM-201.

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This is a Phase 1/2b trial for the treatment of patients with either advanced or refractory B cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Cart 19 cells therapy as measured by overall remission rate, which includes Complete Remission and Complete Remission with incomplete blood count recovery assessment in infants to adults.

Dr. Kadauke is the associate director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Laboratory at CHOP and the medical director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Informatics team. His research focuses on developing novel ways to manufacture cell therapies with the goal of accelerating and broadening patient access to these life-saving therapies.

E-mail:
kadaukes [at] chop.edu

This study will determine the safety and usefulness of using the CliniMACS Prodigy platform to manufacture huCART19 cells.

The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and tolerability of an experimental form of therapy, known as UCART22 ("study drug").

Published on
Sep 19, 2022
CHOP physician-scientists discuss their CAR T-cell therapy research for childhood cancers in Where Discovery Leads.