Inflammatory Bowel Disease | CHOP Research Institute
 

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Published on
Sep 21, 2022
A high school student in the lab of Dr. Kathryn Hamilton won two science fair awards for research he conducted at CHOP.

This study hypothesizes that a flexible dietary intervention of excluding processed and pro-inflammatory ingredients will improve the rate of clinical remission and mucosal healing in Crohn's disease patients, without the need for liquid formula or structured rigid diet.

Dr. Mattei is an attending physician in the Division of General, Thoracic and Fetal Surgery and specializes in pediatric surgical oncology, inflammatory bowel disease, and minimally invasive and robotic surgery. His research interests are in oncology and IBD.

E-mail:
mattei [at] chop.edu

The Penn Human Intervention Core offers a wide array of services to assist with the design and implementation of microbiome studies.

The Penn Microbial Culture and Metabolomics Core features facilities and equipment for the aerobic and anaerobic culture of microbial species in both batch and continuous systems, as well targeted metabolomics services.

The Penn High-throughput Screening (PHTS) Core provides the PennCHOP research community with professional PHTS screening services to identify genes or organic small molecule modulators of signaling pathways, cellular phenotypes, and protein function in models of human disease.

The goals of the Penn Acute Care Biobanking Core are to encourage and facilitate microbiome-focused research in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with critical illness.

The University of Pennsylvania launched the Penn Gnotobiotic Mouse Facility (PGMF) to aid new research in this area and provide investigators with germ-free animal models to further their research.

The Center supports the planning of microbiome projects, DNA purification, library preparation, high-throughput sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis of the output.

The Center for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease is conducting a research study to determine if a structured yoga program, in addition to standard medical treatment, improves quality of life in pediatric patients diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.