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Alix E. Seif, MD, MPH

Alix E. Seif

Dr. Seif's research centers on manipulating the human innate and immune systems to treat children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The long-term goal of her research is to identify innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that can be used to treat pediatric ALL more effectively, and with less toxicity, than existing therapies.


Shaon Sengupta, MBBS, MPH

Shaon Sengupta

Dr. Sengupta is a neonatologist and physician scientist with a long-standing interest in lung health. She studies the mechanisms of circadian regulation of lung inflammation, injury, and repair; and the effect of early life exposures on development and function of pulmonary circadian networks in adulthood.


Rachana Shah, MD, MSTR

Rachana Shah

Dr. Shah's research is centered on understanding obesity and its related complications. Her current work includes clinical and translational studies exploring pathophysiology and modulation of obesity-related adipose tissue and systemic inflammation using human cell lines and clinical trials. She is also involved in clinical studies of outcomes and risk factors of polycystic ovarian syndrome and type 2 diabetes in teens.


Jeffrey H. Silber, MD, PhD

Jeffrey H. Silber

Dr. Silber is the director of the Center for Outcomes Research at CHOP, and is an internationally known authority on outcomes measurement and severity adjustment for both adult and pediatric applications.


Michael Silverman, MD, PhD

Michael Silverman

Dr. Silverman studies the fundamental aspects of early-life commensal microbes that influence immune system development and function. He discovered that the MHC-II E molecule prevents type 1 diabetes by shaping the intestinal microbiota early in life.


Rebecca A. Simmons, MD

Rebecca A. Simmons

The principal goal of Dr. Simmons' research program is to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms that link an aberrant intrauterine milieu to the later development of diseases in adulthood. She has made many seminal contributions to the understanding of the role that epigenetic modifications play in developmental programming of obesity and type 2 diabetes.


Joseph W. St. Geme, III, MD

Joseph W. St. Geme

Dr. St. Geme's research focuses on bacterial pathogenesis, with an emphasis on defining the molecular and cellular determinants of Haemophilus influenzae and Kingella kingae disease.


Charles A. Stanley, MD

Charles A. Stanley Headshot

Dr. Stanley’s lab has identified many of the genes and syndromes associated with congenital hyperinsulinism including ABCC8, GCK, GLUD1, and Turner and Beckwith syndromes. Working with clinical and rodent model studies, his lab team has identified distinctive phenotypes of these disorders, including diazoxide unresponsiveness, leucine sensitivity, and protein sensitivity. Dr. Stanley continues to seek new diagnostic and treatment paradigms for infants with acquired and genetic disorders of hyperinsulinism.


Kathleen E. Sullivan, MD, PhD

Photo of Kathleen E. Sullivan

Dr. Sullivan's research focuses on new and rare immunodeficiencies. She has a long-standing interest in one of the most common of the primary immunodeficiencies – chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. She also investigates common variable immunodeficiency, as well as the genetics and epigenetics of systemic lupus erythematosus.


Dava Szalda, MD, MSHP

Dava Szalda

Dr. Szalda's research focuses on the transition from pediatric to adult care for young adults with medical complexity and cancer survivorship.