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Contact
E-mail
bassing [at] email.chop.edu
Phone
Location - People View
Room 4054

3501 Civic Center Blvd
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Research Topics
Craig H. Bassing, PhD
Craig H. Bassing
Investigator

Dr. Bassing's research program focuses on the genetic, epigenetic, and biochemical mechanisms by which mammals develop their immune systems while suppressing autoimmunity and genomic aberrations that cause leukemia or lymphoma.

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Bio

Dr. Bassing's research program focuses on the genetic, epigenetic, and biochemical mechanisms by which mammals develop their immune systems while suppressing autoimmunity and genomic aberrations that cause leukemia or lymphoma.

Among his current projects, Dr. Bassing is investigating how genome topology regulates transcription and recombination; determining the mechanisms and role of allelic exclusion; researching the mechanisms and function of double strand break (DSB). feedback inhibition of V(D)J recombination; exploring RAG1 post-transcriptional control of gene expression; and investigating the tissue-, lineage-, and developmental-stage specific DNA damage response of immature lymphocytes.

Dr. Bassing and his colleagues have discovered that RAG1/RAG2 DSBs activate tissue-specific DNA damage responses and transcend hazardous intermediates during antigen receptor gene assembly. RAG cleavage in the genomes of lymphocyte progenitors and immature lymphocytes regulates the expression of ubiquitous and lymphocyte-specific gene transcripts to control the differentiation and function of both adaptive and innate lymphocyte lineages.

In addition, Dr. Bassing has shown that RAG1 ubiquitin ligase signals from these DSBs post-transcriptionally shape proteomes of immature lymphocyte, driving the development of B and T cell subtypes and facilitating proper negative selection of strongly auto-reactive cells. These discoveries raise important novel questions that have broad-ranging implications for basic immunology research and the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of human immunological disease.

 

 

Education and Training

BA, Johns Hopkins University (Biology), 1992

PhD, Duke University Medical Center (Biology), 1997

Fellowship, Harvard Medical School (Molecular Immunology), 2002

Titles and Academic Titles

Investigator

Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Professional Memberships

American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1992

American Association of Immunologists, 2005-

American Association for Cancer Research, 2008-

The Henry Kunkel Society, 2010-

Leukocyte Development Section in the Immunology Faculty, 2012-

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 2014-

Professional Awards

Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences, 2005-2009

Michael S. Brown New Investigator Research Award of the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, 2009

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar, 2010-2015

Simon Flexner Award for Outstanding Mentoring of Graduate Students, 2017

Publication Highlights