Samir
 
S.
 
Shah
MD, MSCE
Email: 
shahs@email.chop.edu
Address: 
Division of Infectious Diseases The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia North Campus, Room 1526 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard
215-590-4378
Affiliations
Affiliations
Centers of Emphasis:
Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness
Expertise

Dr. Shah is editor or co-editor of 6 books in the fields of pediatrics and infectious diseases including The Philadelphia Guide: Inpatient Pediatrics (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005), Pediatric Infectious Diseases: The Requisites in Pediatrics (Mosby, 2008), and Pediatric Practice: Infectious Diseases (McGraw-Hill Medical, 2009).

Dr. Shah's research focuses on understanding the pathogenesis of severe childhood pneumonia with the ultimate goal of applying new immunomodulatory therapies in the treatment of high-risk children with pneumonia. Specific ongoing research includes testing the accuracy of a broad-range 16s rDNA polymerase chain reaction test for the detection of pleural fluid bacteria and determing whether a particular pattern of cytokine expression correlates with outcome. Demonstrating this latter association would permit the consideration of cytokine inhibitors in the subset of high risk children.

Pediatric Infectious Diseases: The Requisites ( http://www.amazon.com/Pediatric-Infectious-Diseases-Requisites-Pediatrics/dp/0323020410/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1229352948&sr=8-1 )

Pediatric Practice: Infectious Diseases ( http://www.amazon.com/Pediatric-Practice-Infectious-Samir-Shah/dp/007148924X/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1229352948&sr=8-8 )

Dr. Shah's research seeks to improve the efficiency of the management of children with common childhood infections with a specific focus on pneumonia and meningitis. Ongoing pneumonia-related projects include developing predictive models to identify high-risk children with community-acquired pneumonia, using observational study designs and administrative data to determine optimal treatment approaches to children with pneumonia-related complications, and identifying process measures for children with pneumonia in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. Ongoing meningitis-related projects focus on clarifying the role of adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids on bacterial meningitis and on optimizing the use of novel PCR-based viral and bacterial detection tests to diagnose childhood meningitis. As separate line of work involves advancing the academic discipline of Pediatric Hospital Medicine through a critical examination of factors affecting patient flow and hospital readmission rates.

Keywords: Pneumonia; Streptococcus pneumoniae; invasive pneumococcal disease; observational study design; diagnostic testing; polymerase chain reaction; enterovirus; herpes simplex virus; antibiotic use

Appointments
Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (2011 – 2011)
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (2005 – 2011)
Assistant Professor of Epidemiology in Biostatistics and Epidemiology at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2006– present)
Education
MSCE, Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2007)
MD, Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine (1998)
BA, Biology, University of Pennsylvania (1993)
Selected Publications
Steenhoff AP, Josephs J, Rutstein RM, Gebo KA, Siberry GK, Gaur AH, Warford R, Korthuis T, Spector SA, Shah SS. Incidence and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in a multicenter cohort of HIV-infected children with the conjugate pneumococcal vaccine era. Under review. 2012.
Pasquali SK, Shook GJ, Jacobs JP, O?Brien, SM, Hall M, Welke KF, Gaynor JW, Peterson ED, Shah SS, Li JS. Linking clinical registry data with administrative data using indirect identifiers: Implementation and validation in the congenital heart surgery population. Am Heart J. 2012.
Shah SS, Ebberson J, Kestenbaum LA, Hodinka RL, Zorc JJ. Age-specific cerebrospinal fluid protein reference values in neonates and young infants. J Hosp Med. Vol 5. 2012.
Lorch SA, Millman A, Shah SS. Impact of congenital anomalies and treatment location on the outcomes of infants with herpes simplex virus. J Hosp Med. Vol 5. 2010:154-159.
Fieldston ES, Hall M, Sills MR, Slonim AD, Myers AL, Cannon C, Pati S, Shah SS. Children's hospitals do not acutely respond to high occupancy. Pediatrics. Vol 125. 2010:974-981.
Slonim AD, Khandelwal S, Jianping H, Hall M, Stockwell DC, Turenne WM, Shah SS. Characteristics associated with pediatric inpatient death. Pediatrics. Vol 125. 2010:1208-1216.
Avery RA, Mistry RD, Shah SS, Boswinkel J, Huh JW, Ruppe MD, Borasino S, Licht DJ, Seiden JA, Liu GT. Patient position during lumbar puncture has no meaningful effect on cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure in children. J Child Neurol. Vol 25. 2010:616-619.
Kestenbaum L, Ebberson J, Zorc JJ, Hodinka RL, Shah SS. Defining cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count reference values in neonates and young infants. Pediatrics. Vol 125. 2010:257-264.
Shah SS, Wood SM, Luan X, Ratner AJ. Decline in varicella-related ambulatory visits and hospitalizations in the United States since routine immunization against varicella. Pediatr Infect Dis J. Vol 29. 2010:199-204.
Shah SS, Ten Have TR, Metlay JP. Costs of treating children with complicated pneumonia: a comparison of primary video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and chest tube placement. Pediatr Pulmonol. Vol 45. 2010:71-77.