September 2013

“This partnership offers a mechanism to move our Hospital’s innovative research into the marketplace and better provide health benefits to children and families worldwide.”- Philip R. Johnson, MD

Science and Medicine Feeling the Sequester’s Pinch

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Every new medicine, medical technology, or treatment we rely on today — ones that we take for granted when we walk into a pharmacy to fill a prescription or to purchase pain relievers — stems from one collective source: research. It is intrinsic to the advancement of healthcare. Without research there would be no new treatments or cures. Concerns about the impact of the sequestration on science ha …

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Preserving Prepubescent Boys’ Fertility

Boys_Fertility

The good news is that more children survive cancer now than ever before, as doctors are able to cure nearly 80 percent of patients. But that doesn’t mean that those pediatric patients who survive cancer stop fighting once their treatment ends, because many face a variety of physical and emotional challenges as a result of their treatment. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Cancer Survivorsh …

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Proton Therapy Offers New, Precise Treatment for Neuroblastoma

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Proton therapy, which uses high-energy subatomic particles, may offer a precise, organ-sparing treatment option for children with high-risk forms of neuroblastoma, the most common solid tumor of early childhood. For patients in a new study of advanced radiation treatment, proton therapy spared the liver and kidneys from unwanted radiation, while zeroing in on its target. Protons are the positively …

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New Partnership Will Expand Ways to Move Research to the Marketplace

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Investigators at Children’s Hospital work tirelessly to uncover the inner workings of biological systems and the causes of diseases. But making discoveries is only part of the challenge; the next set of challenges often lies with taking the new knowledge from discoveries and working with outside partners to bring promising new therapeutics and treatments to patients. A partnership between Children …

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Gene Variants Identified in African American Blood Pressure Study

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A new study detailing the largest-ever genetic analysis of blood pressure in African Americans has identified five gene variants linked to the trait. According to the study, which was published recently in the American Journal of Human Genetics, three of the gene variants have not previously been implicated in blood pressure, and represent novel findings. “High blood pressure occurs in roughly 40  …

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Surgery Improves Outcomes for Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Sleep_Apnea

Sleep experts have conducted the first multicenter clinical trial of obstructive sleep apnea in children and have found that those who underwent surgery to remove their adenoids and tonsils had notable improvements in behavior, quality of life and other symptoms compared to those treated with “watchful waiting” and supportive care. However, the researchers found no difference between both groups i …

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Groundbreaking Immune Therapy Featured on 60 Minutes Australia

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The groundbreaking immune therapy work being done by The Children’s of Hospital of Philadelphia’s Stephen M. Grupp, MD, PhD, was recently highlighted on Australia’s 60 Minutes. The Center for Childhood Cancer Research’s Director of Translational Research, Dr. Grupp has seen encouraging early results of a trial using immune therapy to treat an aggressive form of childhood leukemia, acute lymphoblas …

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Orphan Disease Center Seeks to Expedite Orphan Disease Treatments

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Orphan diseases represent a collection of disorders that afflict less than 200,000 individuals for any single disease type, yet there are more than 7,000 distinct orphan diseases. In the aggregate, over 25 million people in the United States suffer substantial morbidity and mortality from orphan diseases. Despite this huge number, research in most disease types has lagged far behind other major ar …

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